Event Title

Paper Session 4-B: Tolkien and Friends

Location

Euler 109

Start Date

3-6-2016 3:30 PM

Description

"Death - 'Gift of Iluvatar' or 'The Last Enemy' -- Theological Reflection on Death in Tolkien's Legendarium" - Richard Cornell

Although Tolkien never set out to teach Christian theology in his Legendarium his Catholic faith shines through in numerous and significant ways. Yet in what Tolkien himself considered the central theme of his work, there seems to be a profound tension with his faith. Death is considered to be the "Gift of Iluvatar" to men. But is not this at odds with the Apostle Paul's conception of death as the result and consequence of sin and the "last enemy" to be defeated by the work of Christ? Tolkien himself suggested in one of this letters that death as the gift of God might be "bad theology." Are these two views of death really at odds with one another or is there a deeper theological connection between these two seemingly incompatible views? This question will be considered with reference to passages from the Silmarillion, the "The Tale of Aragorn and Arwen" (from Appendix A in The Return of the King), the "Athrabeth Finrod Ah Andreth" (published posthumously in Morgoth's Ring), and Tolkien's letters.

"'Frodo, I am Your Father': Reflections on Tolkien, the Virtues and Parenting" - Jim Spiegel and Amy Spiegel

The Lord of the Rings trilogy is rich with exemplifications of the virtues. Inspiring for all dimensions of the moral life, Tolkien's vivid portraits of courage, faithfulness, generosity, and self-control are especially applicable for that great human adventure that is parenting. In this presentation we explore ways in which Tolkien's narrative and character provide insightful metaphors for guiding children into maturity and their own excruciating life quests.

"Subcreation at work: the Art of Tom Loback" - Brad Eden

This paper will focus on the artwork of Tom Loback, whose Tolkien art has graced the covers of Mythlore and other Tolkien journals. The presenter commissioned two large triptychs from Mr. Loback over the last 4 years, prior to his death last year from 9/11-related disease. One is a 3-panel presentation of Feonor making the Silmarils, and the other is a 3-panel presentation of the battle between Morgoth and the Valar at the end of the 1st Age. Mr. Loback was commissioned to make a 3rd triptych depicting the battle between the Valar and Morgoth at the end of the world/Middle-earth, but he was only able to fully complete one panel before his death. The presenter will be bringing these large pieces of artwork to the conference for display and discussion. One of the unique features of Mr. Loback's work is the use of Elvish languages and script throughout his artwork, and the imitation of medieval illumination techniques.

Event Type

Paper

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Jun 3rd, 3:30 PM

Paper Session 4-B: Tolkien and Friends

Euler 109

"Death - 'Gift of Iluvatar' or 'The Last Enemy' -- Theological Reflection on Death in Tolkien's Legendarium" - Richard Cornell

Although Tolkien never set out to teach Christian theology in his Legendarium his Catholic faith shines through in numerous and significant ways. Yet in what Tolkien himself considered the central theme of his work, there seems to be a profound tension with his faith. Death is considered to be the "Gift of Iluvatar" to men. But is not this at odds with the Apostle Paul's conception of death as the result and consequence of sin and the "last enemy" to be defeated by the work of Christ? Tolkien himself suggested in one of this letters that death as the gift of God might be "bad theology." Are these two views of death really at odds with one another or is there a deeper theological connection between these two seemingly incompatible views? This question will be considered with reference to passages from the Silmarillion, the "The Tale of Aragorn and Arwen" (from Appendix A in The Return of the King), the "Athrabeth Finrod Ah Andreth" (published posthumously in Morgoth's Ring), and Tolkien's letters.

"'Frodo, I am Your Father': Reflections on Tolkien, the Virtues and Parenting" - Jim Spiegel and Amy Spiegel

The Lord of the Rings trilogy is rich with exemplifications of the virtues. Inspiring for all dimensions of the moral life, Tolkien's vivid portraits of courage, faithfulness, generosity, and self-control are especially applicable for that great human adventure that is parenting. In this presentation we explore ways in which Tolkien's narrative and character provide insightful metaphors for guiding children into maturity and their own excruciating life quests.

"Subcreation at work: the Art of Tom Loback" - Brad Eden

This paper will focus on the artwork of Tom Loback, whose Tolkien art has graced the covers of Mythlore and other Tolkien journals. The presenter commissioned two large triptychs from Mr. Loback over the last 4 years, prior to his death last year from 9/11-related disease. One is a 3-panel presentation of Feonor making the Silmarils, and the other is a 3-panel presentation of the battle between Morgoth and the Valar at the end of the 1st Age. Mr. Loback was commissioned to make a 3rd triptych depicting the battle between the Valar and Morgoth at the end of the world/Middle-earth, but he was only able to fully complete one panel before his death. The presenter will be bringing these large pieces of artwork to the conference for display and discussion. One of the unique features of Mr. Loback's work is the use of Elvish languages and script throughout his artwork, and the imitation of medieval illumination techniques.