Event Title

Paper Session 3-C: Charles Williams and Friends

Location

Euler 118

Start Date

3-6-2016 11:00 AM

Description

"The Place of the Lion - The book that sparked Lewis and Williams's friendship" - Dan Hamilton

Although the deep and creative friendship of C. S. Lewis and Charles Williams is well known, the precise way that friendship came into being is less well known though highly significant. In fact, before the two men knew each other, they knew each other's books. Of course, Lewis and Williams might say, "What's the difference?" The outlandish but profound Williams novel, The place of the Lion, first attracted Lewis to the ideas and writings (and, eventually, the person) of the eccentric, even by Oxford standards, London writer and editor, Williams. This paper will show the place the novel played in sparking their friendship, especially suitable for a "friendship" colloquium about bookish people. Further, their story will be used as an example of true friendship in crisis.

"C. S. Lewis, Charles Williams, and an Esemplastic Friendship" - Paul E. Michelson

An exploration of C. S. Lewis's idea on friendship through the perspective of his friendship with Charles Williams, who he described in 1945 as "my great friend Charles Williams, my friend of friends...." The paper will be based primarily on correspondence, Lewis's comments in the Williams festschrift, Lewis's Four Loves, and the fiction of the two men.

"The Image of the Library in the Life and Work of Charles Williams" - Michael J. Paulus, Jr.

Charles Williams, the "third" or "oddest" Inkling, was an author and a publisher whose life was significantly shaped by books. But every book he read, wrote, published, or discussed was a compromise--of meaning, form, or craft. Yet each book participated in the hope of redemption and reconciliation through its connection with other books. The way these connections co-inhere suggests an important image for understanding Williams's books as well as his life: the library. Focusing on the Masques of Amen House, a trilogy of plays set in the library of the Oxford University Press London office, this paper explores the central role of the library--real and mythical--for Williams. Though he would have suppressed any references to these midlife masques in a biography, because of his relationship with the figure of the librarian (who compared Williams to "a perfect, heavenly sort of" library), the image of the library in these plays was one that had been present in Williams's past and remained present in future years. Due to the premature end of Williams's life and work, the image of the co-inherent library that is continuously transforming communication into communion provides a richer perspective for understanding Williams than any book by or about him.

Event Type

Paper

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Jun 3rd, 11:00 AM

Paper Session 3-C: Charles Williams and Friends

Euler 118

"The Place of the Lion - The book that sparked Lewis and Williams's friendship" - Dan Hamilton

Although the deep and creative friendship of C. S. Lewis and Charles Williams is well known, the precise way that friendship came into being is less well known though highly significant. In fact, before the two men knew each other, they knew each other's books. Of course, Lewis and Williams might say, "What's the difference?" The outlandish but profound Williams novel, The place of the Lion, first attracted Lewis to the ideas and writings (and, eventually, the person) of the eccentric, even by Oxford standards, London writer and editor, Williams. This paper will show the place the novel played in sparking their friendship, especially suitable for a "friendship" colloquium about bookish people. Further, their story will be used as an example of true friendship in crisis.

"C. S. Lewis, Charles Williams, and an Esemplastic Friendship" - Paul E. Michelson

An exploration of C. S. Lewis's idea on friendship through the perspective of his friendship with Charles Williams, who he described in 1945 as "my great friend Charles Williams, my friend of friends...." The paper will be based primarily on correspondence, Lewis's comments in the Williams festschrift, Lewis's Four Loves, and the fiction of the two men.

"The Image of the Library in the Life and Work of Charles Williams" - Michael J. Paulus, Jr.

Charles Williams, the "third" or "oddest" Inkling, was an author and a publisher whose life was significantly shaped by books. But every book he read, wrote, published, or discussed was a compromise--of meaning, form, or craft. Yet each book participated in the hope of redemption and reconciliation through its connection with other books. The way these connections co-inhere suggests an important image for understanding Williams's books as well as his life: the library. Focusing on the Masques of Amen House, a trilogy of plays set in the library of the Oxford University Press London office, this paper explores the central role of the library--real and mythical--for Williams. Though he would have suppressed any references to these midlife masques in a biography, because of his relationship with the figure of the librarian (who compared Williams to "a perfect, heavenly sort of" library), the image of the library in these plays was one that had been present in Williams's past and remained present in future years. Due to the premature end of Williams's life and work, the image of the co-inherent library that is continuously transforming communication into communion provides a richer perspective for understanding Williams than any book by or about him.